Sitting Down With: Studio Paramita

Candles have been a solace for many in the last year or so, whether it's to liven up a dreary space at home or to tell someone you're thinking of them. Pragga of Studio Paramita creates beautiful sculptural soy candles that remind us to let go of perfection, being present and enjoying the journey to every destination.


You recently launched Studio Paramita - what was your reason for creating a candle brand?


Studio Paramita was born out of a desire to start unapologetically creating again. Even while working a creative job, I found the constant computer work quite monotonous and it was draining my creativity. I needed something which took me out of my head and allowed me to start creating with my hands again without the festering need of perfection eating away at me. And so, Studio Paramita was born.


Paramita in Sanskrit means perfection, as cliche as it sounds, it is a constant reminder for me to find the perfect in the imperfect, find joy in the journey and be more present, rather than the continual stress of searching for perfection. Through Studio Paramita I hope to inspire people to fall in love with themselves again and return to creativity to help their mental health, as that is what it did for me.


Imperfect candles are sold at a discounted price or remelted to create a new product keeping the brand footprint low through fewer materials deliveries.


What is your brand doing to tackle the growing 'fast interiors' problem?


Sustainability was always at the forefront when I was brainstorming Studio Paramita. I wanted the brand to represent a sense of unity with both people and the planet. So, tackling the throwaway fast culture within home decor was mandatory. Even so, producing pieces of the highest quality was extremely important. With both these goals in mind, at Studio Paramita, nothing is wasted. Imperfect candles are sold at a discounted price or remelted to create a new product keeping the brand footprint low through fewer materials deliveries. I also sell mainly sculptural soy wax candles, as they carry more of a timeless aesthetic, similar to the brass and ornate homewares, making them pieces you can style in almost any home to elevate your space.


Coming from an architectural background, a large amount of my follow list consists of architects. I'm a big fan of impactful design, as architecture influences cohesion and social patterns quite heavily.

I think that's the main thing about fast interiors, consumers love to buy so many items which are often not of the best quality as they are made cheaply and hence not sustainable. Whereas, with high-quality timeless items, you achieve a desired aesthetic while not giving in to the fast interiors trend and have pieces that last you a lifetime.



What are your tips for limiting our impact when designing homeware pieces or decorating our homes?


I think as interior enthusiasts we're all hoarders of some kind. We love collecting little trinkets and even larger items to store away for later since we are often changing our spaces around. This is where the main issue of sustainability comes in I think, as we buy more we look for cheaper items. A great way I've found to tackle the consistently shopping of fast interiors is to repurpose and reuse furniture, from either charity shops, antique shops, or old pieces around my own home. It's a great skill to learn and is a lot more rewarding too. There are tonnes of Youtube and online tutorials that teach you how to repurpose furniture, meaning you can create some really special items, exactly the way you want them, without shopping fast interiors and breaking the bank.





Where do you get your inspiration from when it comes to your own space?


I usually pop by my local second-hand furniture shops a few times a month - I've found some great finds there. Etsy, Architectural Digest, Instagram, Soho House and Pinterest are where I get my inspiration from. Lately, I've been obsessed with greenery everywhere. Flowers are a great way to liven up any space, and they add so much character to a room, @sean_anthony_pritchard, and @hiltoncarter are great examples of this.


Coming from an architectural background, a large amount of my follow list consists of architects. I'm a big fan of impactful design, as architecture influences cohesion and social patterns quite heavily. From an interior design perspective, I have found I enjoy following studios that combine different styles and aren't afraid to experiment with their technique a little; I think this helps me stay quite versatile in my tastes too! To name a few favourites, I'd have to say @studio_db, @bornandbredstudio, @finchinteriors, @nest_twenty_eight, @justinablakeneyhome and @dabito.


Follow Pragga and Studio Paramita here on Instagram, website, Pinterest and Etsy.

 

For more inspiration, subscribe to our monthly newsletter: the shelff digest.

Instagram: @shelff.co

Twitter: @shelff_co


Cover image from Studio Paramita.

81 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All